Wednesday, 23 August 2017

R.M. of Pipestone Municipal Office - 100 Years Old

Above the door on the right, the year "1917" is carved in the R.M. office in Reston. Over the years, I recall being told the contractor for the building was Randy's Great Uncle Arthur Henry Bushby.  
Finding out its story and our connection seemed like a great summer project! The Reston Recorder and Pipestone CAO Michelle Halls were generous in their help on my quest. As detailed at this link, the grand old building was granted Provincial Heritage Site #106 on January 25, 1999. 

The first mention of a new building is in the archives of the Recorder's April 25, 1917 edition. Reeve A. E. Smith and Secretary-Treasurer Arthur Perry Power were appointed to a committee to report back to council on the cost of a lot, and brick building, or otherwise, the availability of a suitable building to rent.  The municipal business had so far been done upstairs in the drugstore on the southwest corner of Main and 2nd. 

Reston was a booming prairie town and the main street fires of 1915 and 1916 had also made for plenty of construction work in town. Arthur Bushby, his wife Lou and their 7 children lived in the Harcourt Berry home that was once Jackson Boarding house and is now home to Rick and Lorelei Bloomer.  Lou was musical and was often a soloist in the Anglican Church and a local drama director.  Arthur lived in Reston from 1906-1928 or so, and he is credited with construction of many of Reston's fine homes and businesses including the bank, the Masonic Hall and McMurchy Garage.  In 1926, he was awarded a tender to build a two room high school at a cost of $1145.   Arthur's sister Elsie had married Thomas Boulton in 1915 and lived south of town and another sister Gertie worked at the Recorder.

In the spring of 1917, bylaw 597 was passed for the purchase of Lot 20 Block 28 in Reston for the site of a Municipal Building for $100.  It was to be situated immediately north of the Church of England (Anglican Church). The plan was to use it for a municipal office, council room, and telephone central.  To quote the Recorder:
" The building to be erected will be a handsome brick structure and will doubtless be a credit alike to the town and the municipality ". It was indicated a building of their own would amply justify the savings in rent.

  The  architect hired to design the building was William A. Elliott (1866-1957) of Brandon.  It has been said that many schools and other large buildings share his design vision, and this particular one has been described as an informal Italianate villa style with a broad roof overhang and a corner tower.  The foundation was made ready with a team belonging to J. I. Bulloch and construction began in the fall. 
From Reston Recorder issue September 6, 1917 
October 25, 1917

January 24, 1918

On Monday February 25,1918 Secretary-Treasurer Power moved his office belongings from over the drugstore into the new building. The Recorder reports that the Interior's finishings of clear spruce were varnished to show off their grain.  Some current day pictures below show some of the handiwork upstairs and what is presumed to be original furniture. Renovations were later completed on the council chambers to meet modern needs and accessibility concerns. 







" The clerk's office is directly at the front of the building, well lighted and airy. The door opens in a small hallway where the counter is stationed over which ratepayers can do business with the Clerk. 
The upstairs is divided off into the telephone room, and a room for the night operator, while at the rear of the upstairs of the building can be petitioned off as offices or rooms. "
" The whole structure, both inside and out, presents an imposing appearance and is well worth a visit by each and every ratepayer.  It stands out as a credit to the architect, the contractor, and to the decorator and can be pointed to with pride by every ratepayer."

The 1981 RM history book states the total cost of the building came in at $6713.60 and the first meeting was held in it on March 6, 1918.

I wonder what changes another 100 years will bring to Reston and the R.M. of Pipestone.  I hope this building is still here to see them!


Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Gertrude Mary Bushby (1896 - 1929)

The youngest surviving child of Patience Wooler and James William Bushby was born Gertrude Mary in New Milton on the southern coast of England on November 4, 1896.  The 1911 England census describes her as an apprentice dressmaker as is her sister Myra, also known as "Queenie".  The emigration of brothers Walter and Arthur in 1906 and death of her mother in 1908 would have been deciding factors in her next chapter.  At the age of 16 in 1913, Gertie left for Canada with her older sister Elsie (Randy's Grandma) and their father James.  Elsie married Thomas Boulton the next year in May and began her life as a farm wife and mother.
The Canadian census in 1916 shows Gertie was living with her brother Arthur and his wife Lou in Reston and working as a typesetter.  Recent research in the Reston Recorder newspaper archives confirm that she worked there for four and a half years according to an excerpt from the paper below. 
Gertie's letters sent to Elsie from Yorkton have recently been rediscovered and she writes about going to church and being asked to sing in the choir, going to dances with men from the forces, and the flu epidemic in October of 1918.  She writes that she hopes to visit her sister Queenie in Seattle in March because she is "just dying for a glimpse of the sea". Her single life must be such a contrast to her sister Elsie as she writes to her "Why on earth don't you go into town more?  You are a mutt."  Gertie talks about her wonderful Christmas supper of fried oysters and sliced tomatoes at the Rose Cafe with a Mr. Miller, "a fellow that I have been chumming up for the past six weeks."
A letter from December of 1925 indicates her address is 317 St Julien in Vancouver.  She writes on American Mining & Milling Company letterhead from that city recommending the Boultons purchase stock in the company after a large find of ore.  
On September 21, 1926 a marriage is recorded for Gertrude and Charles McIntyre (1879-1946) in Vancouver.  He is a widower with a 12 year old son William.  The next year they leave for Mission Beach California and an undated letter says One thing I don't like about California is the bareness, no trees except where they are planted.  That's what I always liked abut Vancouver, the beautiful trees."
A daughter, June Eleanor, is born in La Jolla, California on January 21, 1929 but tragically, Gertie died a few short days later in February.  According to family correspondence, Elsie offered to take June to raise with her children but Charles kept her and sent Christmas greetings to the Boultons over the years.  Letters with pictures of June and details of her growing up show he wanted the Bushby sisters to remain a part of her life.  


Daughter June continued the tradition of sending cards at Christmas to her Aunt Elsie after her marriage in 1952 to architect William Lort.   I don't suppose they ever met, but were family just the same.  I'm sure Gertie was pleased.
Any further information or pictures of this connection is welcome at ssimms@escape.ca 


Saturday, 22 April 2017

Sawfish on the Prairies? "Queenie" Bushby (1887-1968)

When we would look at old photos, Randy would pass me some and point to something on the wall behind the person and say - "Look the sawfish!"
           

I thought he was teasing - how would a sawfish show up on a homesteader's house in rural Manitoba? Russ and Rick remember it came from their  Grandma Elsie's sister "Queenie".  It's still in the house somewhere they say!

Myra Elfrida Bushby (aka Queenie) was fifth child of James William Bushby and Patience Emily Wooler.  She was born almost exactly three years after Elsie in Milton, Hampshire, England. In 1923, Queenie left England for Vancouver where her younger sister Gertrude lived with husband Charles McIntyre.  Queenie was a buyer for the dry goods company Fraser-Paterson.  Shortly after, she filed this Declaration of Intention.


This Naturalization Document below is dated nine years later and even includes a grainy picture of Myra.  She never married and was always known as "Aunt Queenie" to the family. 


She was noted to be a buyer for a dry goods company on the 1930 Census when she lived as a lodger at 235 Boylston Avenue in Seattle, Washington.

In 1940, a business can be found at 1206 4th Ave in Seattle called Bushby Apparel Shop with Myra and one employee, Mrs. Lucille Frantz,  doing alterations.  She died (just months before her sister Elsie Boulton) in Seattle on the 12th of January in 1968 and is buried there in the Mount Pleasant Cemetery.

As for the Sawfish, Google found many listings of similar items of antique sawfish bills (also known as carpenter sharks) and are of a family of rays characterized by their long, narrow, flattened nose.  That's so ironic being that the Bushbys were a family of carpenters!

Table Pitchers

Cream Pitchers are not typical tableware today but at one time, they were essential to serve the fresh milk or cream in coffee, tea, on fruit or porridge.  A few that were found at the Boulton house have interesting stories.  They may have belonged to Ann, Elsie or Merle
 The cow's head pitcher below was made in Occupied Japan as the stamp on the bottom indicates.  This makes it easy to date the piece from 1945 - 1952.  As if to prove there is a collector of everything, I found a website Craig's Cow Creamers and entire page of different head models!






Our family used the English pressed glass pitcher above this past Christmas to hold rum sauce for the plum pudding.  There are so many patterns of pressed glass, I was unable to find another just like it but many similar.  


Sandland Ware from Lancaster Ltd in Hanley, England were the makers of this jug with the pattern called Crinoline Lady in an Old World Garden. The company operated from 1944 to 1968 and EBay has plenty of varieties for sale in the pattern.  

None of the jug are particularly valuable but I'm glad to have them for their family connection and they make great dust collectors!